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10 innovators in higher education September 22, 2006

Posted by Tom in Education, Innovation.
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The high school world has started to transform itself to meet the challenges of the shrinking post-Baby Boomer population (turning the phrase “No Child Left Behind” in an operational imperative, not a legislative package related to high-stakes testing). This notion is best conveyed through the “Rigor, Relevance & Relationships” movement in secondary education. Whether taking the form of Career Majors Academies or other models, the new “3 R’s” is taking hold in with our high schools.

While our leading high schools are reeingineering themselves to meet the changing workforce demands of a knowledge-based, post-industrial economy, higher education has been strangely insulated from this sea change in educational philosophy. Well, most of higher education. Popular Mechanics (yes, Popular Mechanics) offers up their top 10 radically innovative institutions of higher learning. What’s their trick, you ask? They’re incorporating the elements of rigor, relevance and relationships.

What a neat article – and congrats to Olin College, University of California-Irvine, Florida State University (Panama City), Carnegie Mellon, Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design, Tufts University, MIT, LSU, Art Center College of Design and Ohio State University for making this presigious list. Other schools had better take notice of what the innovators in higher education are doing.

Thanks to Fortune’s Business Innovation Insider for the link!

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